Friday, February 15, 2019

The VEGA MINITRAC 31 Radiation-based Density, Level, and Flow Measurement Sensor


Radiation is a popular means of density measurement in several industries, including refining and offshore oil and gas.  The VEGA MINITRAC 31 is suitable for liquid and bulk solids applications in vessels that present mechanically difficult process conditions. The measured value is detected non-intrusively, right through the vessel wall. Process fittings and vessel openings are not required. The instrument is therefore ideal for retro-fit applications. The VEGA MINITRAC 31 can be used for many different measuring tasks. Apart from density measurement and level detection, the MINITRAC 31 can also detect residues and the mass flow rate when used in conjunction with a flow meter. This video demonstrates how the sensor uses radiation to reliably and accurately measure the density of liquids and slurries and how operators can use Bluetooth-enhanced display modules for wireless remote access to density sensors.

Classic Controls, Inc.
https://classiccontrols.com
863-644-3642

Thursday, January 31, 2019

Industrial Flow Meter Selection

Industrial Flow Meter Selection
Flow meter selection chart. Click on image for larger view.

Many industrial process control operations require fluid flow measurement as an essential element in the design of the process. The proper application and installation of a flow meter as part of the fluid transfer system will provide accurate flow measurement.

Industrial flow meters use different technologies to measure fluid flow rates directly or indirectly. Some of the most common technologies for fluid flow measurement are vortex flow meters, magnetic flow meters, Coriolis flow meters and rotameters.

Each separate technology has attributes that can make it more suitable for certain applications. The selection of the most appropriate flow measurement technology for an application is an initial and crucial step in the design of a functioning fluid measurement system.

Selection criteria such as fluid temperature, pressure and velocity will be included in the selection process. Further considerations include whether the fluid may be abrasive, corrosive, clean or dirty. The state of the fluid, liquid or gas, must also be taken into account.

The table above provides general guidance on which technologies to consider, based on the above mentioned factors. This will help you to focus further research on product selection.

Contact Classic Controls with any industrial flow application you may have. Their application engineers will provide guidance and advice to assure the proper flow meter is chosen.

Classic Controls
https://classiccontrols.com
863-644-3642

Monday, January 28, 2019

Magnetic Level Indicators (MLIs) and Bridle Combination Units

Magnetic level indicators
Magnetic level indicators provide highly visible indication of level with or without signal outputs monitoring tail and vessel level. The term bridle is used to describe a vertical pipe connected to the side of a storage tank or process vessel, most often with side-to-side or side-to-bottom connections. Because the fluid inside the bridle rises and falls equally with the level of fluid inside the tank or vessel, bridles have been adapted for level measurement use on a broad scale.
Magnetic level indicators

Below is a good instructional reference document (courtesy of VEGA) on how magnetic level indicators (MLIs) are installed and how they work.

Download the "Magnetic Level Indicators and Bridles for Level Measurement and Visualization" document here.

Wednesday, January 16, 2019

Yokogawa SENCOM™ for SMART Liquid Analyzer Communications

SENCOM
SENCOM™ technology allows sensors to transmit and receive data when connected to a FLXA202 or FLXA21 transmitter or to any PC with the SPS24 software installed. Yokogawa SENCOM™ SMART is digital communication designed to optimize your process. Digital or SMART sensors maintain specific measurement and calibration data on an integrated chip and an integral part of the sensor. This data can be exchanged between the sensor and either a process transmitter or a laboratory PC using a data management software, like the SPS24.

For more information, contact Classic Controls by calling 863-644-3642 of visit https://classiccontrols.com.

Wednesday, December 12, 2018

Happy Holidays from Classic Controls

All of us at Classic Controls wish our customers, partners, vendors and friends a very Happy Holiday Season and a wonderful 2019!


Sunday, December 9, 2018

Wireless Remote Monitoring and Control Systems Offers Cost Effective Solution for Tank Level Monitoring System

APPLICATION:
Tanks Wireless Remote Monitoring

When a chemical plant wanted to add level and temperature monitoring to a set of tanks on the edge of their property, the initial proposition was to run a HART cable from the control room to the tank site and, then, branch out to each tank and wire in the level and temperature sensors. The wire length would be several thousand feet between the two points and, then, more to wire sensors to each tank.

PRODUCT SUPPLIED: HART Node
CHALLENGE:

The cost and time associated with this wiring effort, however, was found to be enormous. In addition to the cost of expensive wire, trenching and running conduit was another large added cost. The proposed budget for this upgrade was close to $100K for just the connection costs.

SOLUTION:
HART Node installation

Taking a more cost effective route, the chemical plant decided to use a wireless solution offered by Signal Fire remote monitoring products. Multi-drop HART wireless nodes were installed on the top of each tank and connected – locally – to the sensors associated with each tank. (Nodes serve as the wireless, long-distance communication link in the remote monitoring and control of assets such as tank levels. The nodes extract then transmit data from sensors via a wireless mesh network to a Gateway where data is available via a Modbus RTU or TCP interface.) The total cost of the equipment and installation was a small fraction of the cost of running cable alone and the start-up time was a few hours as opposed to weeks. Additionally, because it was so easy to add additional wireless measurement points, other monitoring points can be easily added to the network in the future.

Reprinted with permission from SignalFire.